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Library Instruction and IL in the Writing Program

WR 122 Argument, Research, and Academic Composition

WR 122, Argument, Research, and Multimodal Composition, continues the focus of WR 121 in its review of rhetorical concepts and vocabulary, in the development of reading, thinking, and writing skills, along with metacognitive competencies understood through the lens of a rhetorical vocabulary. Specifically, students will identify, evaluate, and construct chains of reasoning, a process that includes an ability to distinguish assertion from evidence, recognize and evaluate assumptions, and select sources appropriate for a rhetorical task. Students will employ a flexible, collaborative, and appropriate composing process, working in multiple genres, and utilizing at least two modalities. They will produce 3500-4500 words of revised, final draft copy or an appropriate multimodal analog for this amount of text. If the focus is primarily multimodal, students will produce at least one essay of a minimum of 1500 words, demonstrating competence in both research and academic argumentation.

WR 122 Common Assignment / Common Assessment: Argument Analysis

Argument Analysis

  • First draft due MONTH DATE

  • Peer review due MONTH DATE

  • Second draft due MONTH DATE

For this assignment you will evaluate the effectiveness of an argument.  You will need to include a clear, unbiased summary of the article to orient your readers to the gist of the argument. In addition, present a clearly stated thesis that critically addresses the argument being made and establishes your response to it. You are, in a sense, making an argument about an argument, and you should be able to tell the reader what leads you to believe that you have correctly identified the specific components of the argument, what parts of the argument could have been stronger, how you would propose they be strengthened, how the author considers audience and uses voice, what part of the argument is effective and what is it that makes it so convincing.  Be sure to support your thesis through analysis and questioning of claims and techniques in the article as well as reasoning and evidence from your research to support your perspective

Goals for this assignment are to demonstrate competency in the following outcomes:  

  • Identify structures of traditional argument (deductive logic), Toulmin (claim, warrant, support), and Rogerian (common ground).

  • Evaluate elements of argument such as logic, credibility, evidence, psychological appeals, and fallacies, and distinguish differences among observations, inferences, fact, and opinion.

  • Use appropriate technologies in the service of writing and learning. For example: use word processing tools to prepare and edit formal writing assignments (spell check/grammar check, find and replace); understand the limitations of such tools; locate course materials and resources online; and use online communication tools such as e-mail Word process and format final drafts with appropriate headings, titles, spacing, margins, demonstrating an understanding of MLA citation style.

  • Use the elements of formal argumentation.

  • Demonstrate an ability to summarize, paraphrase, and quote sources in a manner that distinguishes the writer’s voice from that of his/her sources and that gives evidence of understanding the implications of choosing one method of representing a source’s ideas over another.


This assignment should do the following:

  • Adhere to the formatting guidelines described in the syllabus

  • Appropriately document the argument you are analyzing through both in-text and end of paper citations.

  • Use no more than two additional sources to support your argument.

  • Be between 2-3 pages, double-spaced

Argument Analysis Scoring Rubric

 

Grammar and Mechanics

Distracting number of grammar errors.

Does Not Meet (0)

Free of distracting grammar errors.

 

Meets Expectations ( 3)

 

 
 

Formatting


 

Does Not Meet

(0)

Meets Expectations

( 2)

   
 

Identify structure of argument (correctly name the rhetorical structures [claim, grounds, warrant, backing, etc.] used in the text)

Does Not Meet

 

0

Partially Meets Expectations

( - )

Meets Expectations

( - )

Surpasses Expectations

( - 7)

     


 
 

Evaluate (able to make their own logical argument using a strong thesis and support to develop an argument about the text’s argument)

Does Not Meet

 

0

Partially Meets Expectations

(  -  )

Meets Expectations

(   -  )

Surpasses Expectations

(  - 20)

     


 
 

Documentation (in-text; and end of paper citations)

Does Not Meet

 

0

Partially Meets Expectations

(  - )

Meets Expectations

( - )

Surpasses Expectations

(  - 8)

     


 

Integration

(ability to summarize, paraphrase, and/or quote with understanding)

Does Not Meet

 

0

Partially Meets Expectations

(  - )

Meets Expectations

( -  )

Surpasses Expectations

(   - 10)

       

WR 122 Information Literacy and Research Expectations

WR 122 Course Outcomes: Research and Documentation

  1. Incorporate appropriate sources using summary, paraphrase, and quotation.
  2. Document resource material using either MLA or APA citation style including attribution phrases, in-text citations, and a bibliography.
  3. Demonstrate ability to use library databases and search engines effectively and understand source evaluation

In WR 122, students work on developing more sophisticated relationships between sources. Students find scholarly and peer reviewed sources and become familiar with the sections of a research article (e.g., abstract, methodology, findings, conclusion). Students may practice using the works cited list to track down sources and analyze how the scholar uses source material (e.g., quote, summary, paraphrase). 

Subject specific databases are explored in conjunction with the Library Search

  • Science Direct
  • Education Full Text
  • JSTOR
  • Library Search
  • (Topic Finder and Gale Search review from WR 121)

 

Possible Instructional Activities

Practice Bootstrapping 

  • Find one good source
  • Look at the references
  • Track down the references that look useful for the topic

Mind Mapping Video Exercise (depending on time of term)